Get a cutting mat!

A couple of years ago, I finally broke down and bought a 24″ x 36″ self-healing cutting mat and an aluminum meter stick. Now I wonder why I waited so long!

I buy drawing paper in 22″ x 30″ sheets (or even larger sometimes) for a couple of reasons:

  1. It’s much cheaper to cut smaller sheets of the dimensions I really want from these, than it is to buy pre-cut standard sizes
  2. Some of the papers I like are only available as large sheets.

Furthermore, mat board is only available in 30″ x 40″ or larger sheets.

Here’s what I used to do–perhaps this sounds familiar to how you work.  Starting with a large sheet of paper or mat board, I measured from each end, made hash marks in the right spots, and lightly connected them with guide lines with an 18″ metal ruler and pencil.  Four hash marks, two intersecting lines. Then I followed the lines with my ruler and utility knife. For anything longer than 18″, I had to carefully move and align the ruler and make more hash marks, lines and cuts.  All too often and despite my effort, these longer lines or cuts weren’t perfectly aligned. Or my final dimensions were a little off, so my cut paper wasn’t perfectly rectangular.  But I didn’t know it yet!  I lightly marked a 1/2″ margin inside the edges all around and spent days or weeks creating my drawing within the margin.  Then when I finished and prepared to mat it with a 1/4″ margin all around, I discovered that the drawing’s dimensions were a little “off”!  DOH!

With the cutting mat and meter stick, I simply line up the edges of the full sheet with the mat’s grid, lay the meter stick along the line I need, and cut along it. Done! For the inside margin lines, same thing:  I line up the cut paper on the mat, lay the meter stick along the line I need, and lightly draw the margin line along it. Done! And both the cut dimensions and the margin box are truly rectangular. Perfect dimensions in a fraction of the time.

img_6774

Ready to cut an 8″ x 10″ from a larger piece of drawing paper

Today I cut 5 sheets of 26″ x 40″ Stonhenge paper into 60 sheets of 8″ x 10″ in only about 45 minutes, working at a leisurely pace. And they’re all perfect, according to how well they stacked.

You might be saying “What about the fact that a meter stick is 39″ and a full sheet of mat board is 40″? I lay my 18” ruler atop the meter stick to effectively extend it.

The cutting mat also has lines denoting 45- and 60-degree angles (but I haven’t needed those yet).  And if you prefer metric measurement, two edges of the mat are marked in centimeters.

When not in use, I slide my cutting mat behind my desk against the wall, and hang my meter stick on a nail.

Self-healing cutting mats of various sizes, and aluminum measuring sticks are available at any art supply store, and they’re not expensive. If you cut paper or mat board more than a couple of times a year, I recommend the investment. You, too, will wonder why you waited so long!

4 thoughts on “Get a cutting mat!

  1. Cutting mats are amazing. I have three or four now and lots of cutters and rulers for them too!! Not sure if you are aware or not but I thought I’d let you know, just in case, that these boards can be seriously ruined. When not using it, you should store it flat, away from sun (dries it out, causing it to crack) and far from heat, including sun. When the mat warms it will warp. Once warped, you are buggered. Learned this the hard way. No one told me about that.

    • Thank you for the advice! The heat and sunlight affects make sense. Mine is stored away from them, but it’s not stored flat, it’s behind a desk against a wall. It has never failed to lay perfectly flat when I put it to use, so I suppose it has a long life ahead. Even if it doesn’t, it will have been well worth the money.

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